Charles Pierce

#47881 Charles Pierce

It has never been in my power to study anything … except as a study of . .

Charles Pierce Quotes about power
#47882 Charles Pierce

By an object, I mean anything that we can think, i.e. anything we can talk about. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about think
#47883 Charles Pierce

The entire universe is perfused with signs, if it is not composed exclusively of signs. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about universe
#47884 Charles Pierce

The Protestant churches generally hold that the elements of the sacrament are flesh and blood only in a tropical sense; they nourish ouras meat and the juice of it would our bodies. But the Catholics maintain that they are literally just that; although they possess all the sensible qualities of wafer-cakes and diluted wine. But we can have no conception of wine except what may enter into a belief, either — .

Charles Pierce Quotes about belief
#47886 Charles Pierce

The consciousness of a general idea has a certain "unity of the ego" in it, which is identical when it passes from one mind to another. It is, therefore, quite analogous to a person, and indeed, a person is only a particular kind of general idea. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about art
#47887 Charles Pierce

It is the man of , eager to have his every opinion regenerated, his every idea rationalized, by drinking at the fountain of fact, and devoting all the energies of histo the cult of , not as he understands it, but as he does not yet understand it, that ought properly to be called a . To an earlier age knowledge was— merely that and nothing more; to us it is life and the . Emancipation from the bonds of , of one's own prepossessions, importunately sought at the hands of that rational power before which all must ultimately bow, — this is the characteristic that distinguishes all the great figures of nineteenth-century science from those of former periods. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about life
#47888 Charles Pierce

You are of all my friends the one who illustratesin its most needful forms. You are a jewel of pragmatism. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about friends
#47889 Charles Pierce

It is important to understand what I mean by . All dynamic action, or action of brute force, physical or psychical, either takes place between two subjects, — whether they react equally upon each other, or one is agent and the other patient, entirely or partially, — or at any rate is a resultant of such actions between pairs. But by "semiosis" I mean, on the contrary, an action, or influence, which is, or involves, a cooperation of three subjects, such as a sign, its object, and its interpretant, this tri-relative influence not being in any way resolvable into actions between pairs. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about art
#47890 Charles Pierce

I define a Sign as anything which is so determined by something else, called its Object, and so determines an effect upon a person, which effect I call its Interpretant, that the latter is thereby mediately determined by the former. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about media
#47891 Charles Pierce

It has never been in my power to study anything, — mathematics, ethics, metaphysics, gravitation, thermodynamics, optics, chemistry, comparative anatomy, astronomy, psychology, phonetics, economics, the history of science, whist, men and women, wine, metrology, except as a study of . .

Charles Pierce Quotes about science
#47892 Charles Pierce

The definition of definition is at bottom just what the maxim ofexpresses. .

Charles Pierce
#47895 Charles Pierce

It is terrible to see how a single unclear idea, a single formula without meaning, lurking in a young man’s head, will sometimes act like an obstruction ... in an artery, hindering the nutrition of the brain, and condemning its victim to pine away in the fullness of his intellectual vigor and in the midst of intellectual plenty. "How to make our ideas clear,” Popular Science, January 1878 .

Charles Pierce Quotes about time
#47896 Charles Pierce

"On The Algebra of Logic : A Contribution to the Philosophy of Notation" in The American Journal of Mathematics 7 (1885), p. 180 - 202 .

Charles Pierce Quotes about philosophy
#47897 Charles Pierce

A sign is in a conjoint relation to the thing denoted and to the mind. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about mind
#47898 Charles Pierce

The index asserts nothing; it only says "There!" It takes hold of our eyes, as it were, and forcibly directs them to a particular object, and there it stops. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about art
#47899 Charles Pierce

The actual world cannot be distinguished from a world of imagination by any description. Hence the need of pronoun and indices, and the more complicated the subject the greater the need of them. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about world
#47902 Charles Pierce

I call a sign which stands for something merely because it resembles it, an icon. Icons are so completely substituted for their objects as hardly to be distinguished from them. Such are the diagrams of geometry. A , indeed, so far as it has a general signification, is not a pure icon; but in the middle part of our reasonings we forget that abstractness in great measure, and the diagram is for us the very thing. So in contemplating a painting, there is a moment when we lose the consciousness that it is not the thing, the distinction of the real and the copy disappears, and it is for the moment a pure dream, — not any particular existence, and yet not general. At that moment we are contemplating an icon. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about art
#47903 Charles Pierce

I have taken pains to make my distinction of icons, indices, and tokens clear, in order to enunciate this proposition: in a perfect system of logical notation signs of these several kinds must all be employed. Without tokens there would be no generality in the statements, for they are the only general signs; and generality is essential to reasoning. ... But tokens alone do not state what is the subject of discourse ; and this can, in fact, not be described in general terms ; it can only be indicated. The actual world cannot be distinguished from a world of imagination by any description. Hence the need of pronoun and indices, and the more complicated the subject the greater the need of them. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about pain
#47904 Charles Pierce

Now, to say that a lot of objects is finite, is the same as to say that if we pass through the class from one to another we shall necessarily come round to one of those individuals already passed; that is, if every one of the lot is in any one-to-one relation to one of the lot, then to every one of the lot some one is in this same relation. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about read
#47905 Charles Pierce

Mathematical Monads (23 January 1889) published in Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition (1982) edited by Max Harold Fisch, Vol. 6 .

Charles Pierce Quotes about logic
#47906 Charles Pierce

"It lightens and it thunders," is conjunctive, "It lightens or it thunders" is disjunctive. Each such individual act of connecting a pair of statements is a new monad for the mathematician. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about men
#47907 Charles Pierce

As the mathematics are now understood, each branch — or, if you please, each problem, — is but the study of the relations of a collection of connected objects, without parts, without any distinctive characters, except their names or designating letters. These objects are commonly called points; but to remove all notion of space relations, it may be better to name them monads. The relations between these points are mere complications of two different kinds of elementary relations, which may be termed immediate connection and immediate non-connection. All the monads except as serve as intermediaries for the connections have distinctive designations. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about art
#47908 Charles Pierce

A pair of statements may be taken conjunctively or disjunctively; for example, "It lightens and it thunders," is conjunctive, "It lightens or it thunders" is disjunctive. Each such individual act of connecting a pair of statements is a new monad for the mathematician. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about men
#47909 Charles Pierce

First published in The Monist Vol. I, No. 2 (January 1891), p. 161 .

Charles Pierce
#47910 Charles Pierce

I think we may safely say that the studies preliminary to the construction of a great theory should be at least as deliberate and thorough as those that are preliminary to the building of a dwelling-house. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about think
#47911 Charles Pierce

Uniformities are precisely the sort of facts that need to be accounted for. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about need
#47912 Charles Pierce

Feelings, by being excited, become more easily excited, especially in the ways in which they have previously been excited. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about being
#47914 Charles Pierce

To suppose universal laws of nature capable of being apprehended by the mind and yet having no reason for their special forms, but standing inexplicable and irrational, is hardly a justifiable position. Uniformities are precisely the sort of facts that need to be accounted for. That a pitched coin should sometimes turn up heads and sometimes tails calls for no particular explanation; but if it shows heads every time, we wish to know how this result has been brought about. Law is par excellence the thing that wants a reason. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about time
#47915 Charles Pierce

The only possible way of accounting for the laws of nature and for uniformity in general is to suppose them results of evolution. This supposes them not to be absolute, not to be obeyed precisely. It makes an element of indeterminacy, spontaneity, or absolute chance in nature. Just as, when we attempt to verify any physical law, we find our observations cannot be precisely satisfied by it, and rightly attribute the discrepancy to errors of observation, so we must suppose far more minute discrepancies to exist owing to the imperfect cogency of the law itself, to a certain swerving of the facts from any definite formula. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about nature
#47917 Charles Pierce

The law of habit exhibits a striking contrast to all physical laws in the character of its commands. A physical law is absolute. What it requires is an exact relation. Thus, a physical force introduces into a motion a component motion to be combined with the rest by the parallelogram of forces; but the component motion must actually take place exactly as required by the law of force. On the other hand, no exact conformity is required by the mental law. Nay, exact conformity would be in downright conflict with the law ; since it would instantly crystallise thought and prevent all further formation of habit. The law of mind only makes a given feeling more likely to arise. It thus resembles the "non-conservative" forces of physics, such as viscosity and the like, which are due to statistical uniformities in the chance encounters of trillions of molecules. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about mind
#47918 Charles Pierce

The old dualistic notion of mind and matter, so prominent in Cartesianism, as two radically different kinds of substance, will hardly find defenders to-day. Rejecting this, we are driven to some form of hylopathy, otherwise called . .

Charles Pierce Quotes about art
#47919 Charles Pierce

The one intelligible theory of the universe is that of objective idealism, that matter is effete mind, inveterate habits becoming physical laws. But before this can be accepted it must show itself capable of explaining the tridimensionality of space, the laws of motion, and the general characteristics of the universe, with mathematical clearness and precision ; for no less should be demanded of every Philosophy. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about mind
#47920 Charles Pierce

Three conceptions are perpetually turning up at every point in every theory of , and in the most rounded systems they occur in connection with one another. They are conceptions so very broad and consequently indefinite that they are hard to seize and may be easily overlooked. I call them the conceptions of First, Second, Third. First is the conception of being or existing independent of anything else. Second is the conception of being relative to, the conception of reaction with, something else. Third is the conception of mediation, whereby a first and second are brought into relation. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about action
#47922 Charles Pierce

May some future student go over this ground again, and have the leisure to give his results to the world. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about future
#47923 Charles Pierce

To "postulate" a proposition is no more than to hope it is true. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about hope
#47924 Charles Pierce

First published in The Monist Vol. II, No. 3 (April 1892), p. 321 .

Charles Pierce
#47926 Charles Pierce

First published in The Monist Vol. II, No. 4 (July 1892), p. 533 .

Charles Pierce
#47927 Charles Pierce

A serious student of philosophy will be in no haste to accept or reject this doctrine; but he will see in it one of the chief attitudes which speculative thought may take, feeling that it is not for an individual, nor for an age, to pronounce upon a fundamental question of philosophy. That is a task for a whole era to work out. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about philosophy
#47928 Charles Pierce

The tendency to regard continuity, in the sense in which I shall define it, as an idea of prime importance in philosophy conveniently may be be termed . .

Charles Pierce Quotes about philosophy
#47929 Charles Pierce

We are accustomed to speak of ideas as reproduced, as passed from mind to mind, as similar or dissimilar to one another, and, in short, as if they were substantial things; nor can any reasonable objection be raised to such expressions. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about mind
#47930 Charles Pierce

Some minds will jump here jump to the conclusion that a past idea cannot in any sense be present. But that is hasty and illogical. How extravagant too, to pronounce our whole knowledge of the past to be mere delusion! .

Charles Pierce Quotes about knowledge
#47931 Charles Pierce

In the case of colors, there is a tridimensional spread of feelings. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about men
#47932 Charles Pierce

The first character of a general idea … is that it is living feeling … in its absence of boundedness a vague possibility of more than is present is directly felt. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about living
#47933 Charles Pierce

Feeling which has not yet emerged into immediate consciousness is already affectible and already affected. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about consciousness
#47934 Charles Pierce

The uncertainty of the mental law is no mere defect of it, but is on the contrary of its essence. The truth is, the mind is not subject to "law," in the same rigid sense that matter is. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about truth
#47935 Charles Pierce

There always remains a certain amount of arbitrary spontaneity in its action, without which it would be dead. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about action
#47936 Charles Pierce

In an article published in The Monist for January, 1891, I endeavored to show what ideas ought to form the warp of a system of philosophy, and particularly emphasized that of absolute chance. In the number of April, 1892, I argued further in favor of that way of thinking, which it will be convenient to christen(from .

Charles Pierce Quotes about philosophy
#47937 Charles Pierce

The tendency to regard continuity, in the sense in which I shall define it, as an idea of prime importance in philosophy conveniently may be be termed . The present paper is intended chiefly to show what synechism is, and what it leads to. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about philosophy
#47938 Charles Pierce

applied to mental phenomenon shows that there is but one law of mind, namely that ideas tend to spread continuously and to affect certain others which stand to them in a peculiar relation of affectibility. In this spreading they lose intensity, and especially the power of affecting others, but gain generality and become welded with other ideas. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about reading
#47939 Charles Pierce

We are accustomed to speak of ideas as reproduced, as passed from mind to mind, as similar or dissimilar to one another, and, in short, as if they were substantial things; nor can any reasonable objection be raised to such expressions. But taking the word "idea" in the sense of an event in an individual consciousness, it is clear that an idea once past is gone forever, and any supposed recurrence of it is another idea. These two ideas are not present in the same state of consciousness, and therefore cannot possibly be compared. .

Charles Pierce Quotes about mind

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