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Jane Austen (Writer)

One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other. ~
Jane Austen world
Here I am once more in this scene of dissipation and vice, and I begin already to find my morals corrupted.
Jane Austen read
What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps one in a continual state of inelegance.
Jane Austen read
Next week I shall begin my operations on my hat, on which you know my principal hopes of happiness depend.
Jane Austen happiness
I am very much obliged to my dear little George for his message - for his love at least; his duty, I suppose, was only in consequence of some hint of my favourable intentions towards him from his father or mother. I am sincerely rejoiced, however, that I ever was born, since it has been the means of procuring him a dish of tea.
Jane Austen love
I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.
Jane Austen people
You deserve a longer letter than this; but it is my unhappy fate seldom to treat people so well as they deserve.
Jane Austen people
I had a very pleasant evening, however, though you will probably find out that there was no particular reason for it; but I do not think it worth while to wait for enjoyment until there is some real opportunity for it.
Jane Austen art
I am rather impatient to know the fate of my best gown.
Jane Austen fate
I cannot help thinking that it is more natural to have flowers grow out of the head than fruit.
Jane Austen thinking
I can recollect nothing more to say at present; perhaps breakfast may assist my ideas. I was deceived - my breakfast supplied only two ideas - that the rolls were good and the butter bad.
Jane Austen good
In Paragon we met Mrs. Foley and Mrs. Dowdeswell with her yellow shawl airing out, and at the bottom of Kingsdown Hill we met a gentleman in a buggy, who, on minute examination, turned out to be Dr. Hall - and Dr. Hall in such very deep mourning that either his mother, his wife, or himself must be dead.
Jane Austen self
Your abuse of our gowns amuses but does not discourage me; I shall take mine to be made up next week, and the more I look at it the better it pleases me. My cloak came on Tuesday, and, though I expected a good deal, the beauty of the lace astonished me. It is too handsome to be worn - almost too handsome to be looked at.
Jane Austen beauty
I believe I drank too much wine last night at Hurstbourne; I know not how else to account for the shaking of my hand today. You will kindly make allowance therefore for any indistinctness of writing, by attributing it to this venial error.
Jane Austen writing
The General has got the gout, and Mrs. Maitland the jaundice. Miss Debary, Susan, and Sally, all in black, but without any stature, made their appearance, and I was as civil to them as their bad breath would allow me.
Jane Austen wit
We have been exceedingly busy ever since you went away. In the first place we have had to rejoice two or three times everyday at your having such very delightful weather for the whole of your journey...
Jane Austen time
One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy. ~
Jane Austen food
I have now attained the true art of letter-writing, which we are always told, is to express on paper exactly what one would say to the same person by word of mouth.
Jane Austen writing
You are very kind in planning presents for me to make, and my mother has shown me exactly the same attention; but as I do not choose to have generosity dictated to me, I shall not resolve on giving my cabinet to Anna till the first thought of it has been my own.
Jane Austen thought
Another stupid party last night; perhaps if larger they might be less intolerable, but here there were only just enough to make one card-table, with six people to look on and talk nonsense to each other.
Jane Austen art
Mrs. B. and two young women were of the same party, except when Mrs. B. thought herself obliged to leave them to run round the room after her drunken husband. His avoidance, and her pursuit, with the probable intoxication of both, was an amusing scene.
Jane Austen women
I cannot anyhow continue to find people agreeable; I respect Mrs. Chamberlayne for doing her hair well, but cannot feel a more tender sentiment. Miss Langley is like any other short girl, with a broad nose and wide mouth, fashionable dress and exposed bosom. Adm. Stanhope is a gentleman-like man, but then his legs are too short and his tail too long.
Jane Austen hope
It would have amused you to see our progress. We went up by Sion Hill, and returned across the fields. In climbing a hill Mrs. Chamberlayne is very capital; I could with difficulty keep pace with her, yet would not flinch for the world. On plain ground I was quite her equal. And so we posted away under a fine hot sun, she without any parasol or any shade to her hat, stopping for nothing, and crossing the churchyard at Weston with as much expedition as if we were afraid of being buried alive.
Jane Austen world
We are to have a tiny party here tonight. I hate tiny parties, they force one into constant exertion.
Jane Austen art
You will have a great deal of unreserved discourse with Mrs. K., I dare say, upon this subject, as well as upon many other of our family matters. Abuse everybody but me.
Jane Austen family
You know how interesting the purchase of a sponge-cake is to me.
Jane Austen you
We spent Friday evening with our friends at the boarding-house, and our curiosity was gratified by the sight of their fellow-inmates, Mrs. Drew and Miss Hook, Mr. Wynne and Mr. Fitzhugh; the latter is brother to Mrs. Lance, and very much the gentleman. He has lived in that house more than twenty years, and poor man, is so totally deaf that they say he could not hear a cannon, were it fired close to him; having no cannon at hand to make the experiment, I took it for granted, and talked to him a little with my fingers, which was funny enough.
Jane Austen funny
I am gratified by her having pleasure in what I write, but I wish the knowledge of my being exposed to her discerning criticism may not hurt my style, by inducing too great a solicitude. I begin already to weigh my words and sentences more than I did, and am looking about for a sentiment, an illustration, or a metaphor in every corner of the room. Could my ideas flow as fast as the rain in the store-closet it would be charming.
Jane Austen knowledge
I am sorry to tell you that I am getting very extravagant, and spending all my money, and, what is worse for you, I have been spending yours too.
Jane Austen money
I give you joy of our new nephew, and hope if he ever comes to be hanged it will not be till we are too old to care about it.
Jane Austen hope
My head-dress was a bugle-band like the border to my gown, and a flower of Mrs Tilson’s. I depended upon hearing something of the evening from Mr. W. K., and am very well satisfied with his notice of me - "A pleasing looking young woman" - that must do; one cannot pretend to anything better now; thankful to have it continued a few years longer!
Jane Austen man
How horrible it is to have so many people killed! And what a blessing that one cares for none of them!
Jane Austen people
I will not say that your mulberry-trees are dead, but I am afraid they are not alive.
Jane Austen live
He seems a very harmless sort of young man, nothing to like or dislike in him - goes out shooting or hunting with the two others all the morning, and plays at whist and makes queer faces in the evening.
Jane Austen man
By the bye, as I must leave off being young, I find many douceurs in being a sort of chaperon, for I am put on the sofa near the fire and can drink as much wine as I like.
Jane Austen man
I cannot help hoping that many will feel themselves obliged to buy it. I shall not mind imagining it a disagreeable duty to them, so as they do it.
Jane Austen mind
The Webbs are really gone! When I saw the waggons at the door, and thought of all the trouble they must have in moving, I began to reproach myself for not having liked them better, but since the waggons have disappeared my conscience has been closed again, and I am excessively glad they are gone.
Jane Austen science
There are such beings in the world - perhaps one in a thousand - as the creature you and I should think perfection; where grace and spirit are united to worth, where the manners are equal to the heart and understanding; but such a person may not come in your way, or, if he does, he may not be the eldest son of a man of fortune, the near relation of your particular friend, and belonging to your own county.
Jane Austen art
His having been in love with the aunt gives Cecilia an additional interest with him. I like the idea - a very proper compliment to an aunt! I rather imagine indeed that nieces are seldom chosen but out of compliment to some aunt or another. I daresay Ben [Anna's husband] was in love with me once, and would never have thought of you if he had not supposed me dead of scarlet fever.
Jane Austen love
I could no more write a romance than an epic poem. I could not sit seriously down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life; and if it were indispensable for me to keep it up and never relax into laughing at myself or other people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the first chapter. No, I must keep to my own style and go on in my own way; and though I may never succeed again in that, I am convinced that I should totally fail in any other.
Jane Austen life
We saw a countless number of post-chaises full of boys pass by yesterday morning - full of future heroes, legislators, fools, and villains. You have never thanked me for my last letter, which went by the cheese. I cannot bear not to be thanked.
Jane Austen future
I give you joy of having left Winchester. Now you may own how miserable you were there; now it will gradually all come out, your crimes and your miseries - how often you went up by the Mail to London and threw away fifty guineas at a tavern, and how often you were on the point of hanging yourself, restrained only, as some ill-natured aspersion upon poor old Winton has it, by the want of a tree within some miles of the city.
Jane Austen nature
What should I do with your strong, manly, spirited sketches, full of variety and glow? How could I possibly join them on to the little bit (two inches wide) of ivory on which I work with so fine a brush, as produces little effect after much labour?
Jane Austen work
I would recommend to her and Mr. D. the simple regimen of separate rooms.
Jane Austen men
Single women have a dreadful propensity for being poor, which is one very strong argument in favour of matrimony.
Jane Austen women
He and I should not in the least agree, of course, in our ideas of novels and heroines. Pictures of perfection, as you know, make me sick and wicked; but there is some very good sense in what he says, and I particularly respect him for wishing to think well of all young ladies; it shows an amiable and a delicate mind. And he deserves better treatment than to be obliged to read any more of my works.
Jane Austen art
Many thanks for your kind care for my health; I certainly have not been well for many weeks, and about a week ago I was very poorly. I have had a good deal of fever at times, and indifferent nights; but I am considerably better now and am recovering my looks a little, which have been bad enough - black and white, and every wrong colour. I must not depend upon being ever very blooming again. Sickness is a dangerous indulgence at my time of life.
Jane Austen life
I eat my meals with Aunt Cassandra in a rational way, and can employ myself, and walk from one room to another. Mr. Lyford says he will cure me, and if he fails, I shall draw up a memorial and lay it before the Dean and Chapter, and have no doubt of redress from that pious, learned, and disinterested body.
Jane Austen self
Sophia shrieked and fainted on the ground—I screamed and instantly ran mad! We remained thus mutually deprived of our senses some minutes, and on regaining them were deprived of them again. For an hour and a quarter did we continue in this unfortunate situation.
Jane Austen art
It was in this reign that Joan of Arc reigned and made such a row among the English.
Jane Austen
There were several Battles between the Yorkists and the Lancastrians, in which the former (as they ought) usually won.
Jane Austen battle
She [Mary I] married Philip King of Spain, who in her sister's reign, was famous for building Armadas.
Jane Austen pain
"I am afraid", replied Elinor, "that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety."
Jane Austen men
People always live forever when there is an annuity to be paid them.
Jane Austen live
It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.
Jane Austen truth
To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.
Jane Austen love
Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.
Jane Austen marriage
One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.
Jane Austen man
For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors and laugh at them in our turn? 
Jane Austen live
One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.
Jane Austen love
A lady, without a family, was the very best preserver of furniture in the world.
Jane Austen family
It was, perhaps, one of those cases in which advice is good or bad only as the event decides.
Jane Austen advice
A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.
Jane Austen happiness
An engaged woman is always more agreeable than a disengaged. She is satisfied with herself. Her cares are over, and she feels that she may exert all her powers of pleasing without suspicion. All is safe with a lady engaged: no harm can be done.
Jane Austen power
We do not look in great cities for our best morality.
Jane Austen morality
She was of course only too good for him; but as nobody minds having what is too good for them, he was very steadily earnest in the pursuit of the blessing...
Jane Austen mind
I speak what appears to me the general opinion; and where an opinion is general, it is usually correct.
Jane Austen opinion
Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery.
Jane Austen guilt
"I shall soon be rested," said Fanny; "to sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure, is the most perfect refreshment."
Jane Austen men
it will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.
Jane Austen believe
It is a lovely night, and they are much to be pitied who have not been taught to feel, in some degree, as you do; who have not, at least, been given a taste for Nature in early life. They lose a great deal.
Jane Austen love
But there certainly are not so many men of large fortune in the world as there are pretty women to deserve them.
Jane Austen women
One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.
Jane Austen world
Business, you know, may bring money, but friendship hardly ever does.
Jane Austen friendship
...why did we wait for any thing? — why not seize the pleasure at once? — How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!
Jane Austen happiness
Human nature is so well disposed towards those who are in interesting situations, that a young person, who either marries or dies, is sure of being kindly spoken of.
Jane Austen war
Surprizes are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced, and the inconvenience is often considerable.
Jane Austen pleasure
There are people who the more you do for them, the less they will do for themselves.
Jane Austen people
Ah! there is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.
Jane Austen home
One has not great hopes from Birmingham. I always say there is something direful in the sound...
Jane Austen hope
To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain for the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive.
Jane Austen life
A woman, especially if she has the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.
Jane Austen man
Could they be perpetrated without being known, in a country like this, where social and literary intercourse is on such a footing, where every man is surrounded by a neighbourhood of voluntary spies, and where roads and newspapers lay everything open?
Jane Austen man
...from politics, it was an easy step to silence.
Jane Austen politics
It would be mortifying to the feelings of many ladies, could they be made to understand how little the heart of man is affected by what is costly or new in their attire.
Jane Austen art
A very short trial convinced her that a curricle was the prettiest equipage in the world
Jane Austen world
The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel must be intolerably stupid
Jane Austen man
There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart.
Jane Austen art
There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.
Jane Austen home
Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves; vanity, to what we would have others think of us.
Jane Austen words
Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
Jane Austen love
My idea of good company is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.
Jane Austen people
Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.
Jane Austen hope
Single women have a dreadful propensity for being poor. Which is one very strong argument in favor of matrimony.
Jane Austen women
Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.
Jane Austen success
If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more.
Jane Austen love
Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody.
Jane Austen education
We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.
Jane Austen person
To sit in the shade on a fine day and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment.
Jane Austen men
Nobody minds having what is too good for them.
Jane Austen mind

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