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John Dryden (Writer)

Death in itself is nothing; but we fear To be we know not what, we know not where.
John Dryden fear
An horrid stillness first invades the ear, And in that silence we the tempest fear.
John Dryden fear
By viewing Nature, Nature's handmaid Art, Makes mighty things from small beginnings grow.
John Dryden win
[T]he Famous Rules which the French call, Des Trois Unitez, or, The Three Unities, which ought to be observ'd in every Regular Play; namely, of Time, Place, and Action.
John Dryden time
Pains of love be sweeter far Than all other pleasures are. Their heavenly harps a lower strain began, and in soft music mourn the fall of man. And oft with holy hymns he charm'd their ears, And music more melodious than the spheres.
John Dryden love
[Music] is inarticulate poesy.
John Dryden art
All delays are dangerous in war.
John Dryden war
Pains of love be sweeter far Than all other pleasures are.
John Dryden love
... not judging truth to be in nature better than falsehood, but setting a value on both according to interest.
John Dryden truth
When I consider life, 't is all a cheat. Yet fool'd with hope, men favour the deceit; Trust on, and think to-morrow will repay. To-morrow 's falser than the former day; Lies worse, and while it says we shall be blest With some new joys, cuts off what we possest. Strange cozenage! none would live past years again, Yet all hope pleasure in what yet remain; And from the dregs of life think to receive What the first sprightly running could not give.
John Dryden life
'T is not for nothing that we life pursue; It pays our hopes with something still that's new.
John Dryden life
If others in the same Glass better see 'Tis for Themselves they look, but not for me: For my Salvation must its Doom receive Not from what others, but what I believe.
John Dryden believe
More Safe, and much more modest 'tis, to say God wou'd not leave Mankind without a way: And that the Scriptures, though not every where Free from Corruption, or intire, or clear, Are uncorrupt, sufficient, clear, intire, In all things which our needfull Faith require.If others in the same Glass better see 'Tis for Themselves they look, but not for me: For my Salvation must its Doom receive Not from what others, but what I believe.
John Dryden believe
Bold knaves thrive without one grain of sense, But good men starve for want of impudence.
John Dryden men
Men met each other with erected look, The steps were higher that they took; Friends to congratulate their friends made haste, And long inveterate foes saluted as they passed.
John Dryden friends
Since heaven's eternal year is thine.
John Dryden heaven
O gracious God! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly gift of poesy!
John Dryden heaven
Her wit was more than man, her innocence a child.
John Dryden man
Preventing angels met it half the way, And sent us back to praise, who came to pray.
John Dryden angels
Our vows are heard betimes! and Heaven takes care To grant, before we can conclude the prayer:Preventing angels met it half the way, And sent us back to praise, who came to pray.
John Dryden time
And torture one poor word ten thousand ways.
John Dryden poor
Three poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn. The first in loftiness of thought surpassed; The next, in majesty; in both the last. The force of Nature could no further go. To make a third, she joined the former two.
John Dryden thought
This is the porcelain clay of humankind.
John Dryden man
I have a soul that like an ample shield Can take in all, and verge enough for more.
John Dryden soul
A knockdown argument: 'tis but a word and a blow.
John Dryden men
Whistling to keep myself from being afraid.
John Dryden self
The true Amphitryon is the Amphitryon where we dine.
John Dryden true
Fairest Isle, all isles excelling, Seat of pleasures, and of loves; Venus here will choose her dwelling, And forsake her Cyprian groves.
John Dryden love
There is still a vast difference betwixt the slovenly Butchering of a Man, and the fineness of a stroke that separates the Head from the Body, and leaves it standing in its place.
John Dryden love
Thus all below is strength, and all above is grace.
John Dryden strength
Genius must be born, and never can be taught.
John Dryden genius
Be kind to my remains; and oh defend, Against your judgment, your departed friend!
John Dryden art
Look round the habitable world: how few Know their own good, or knowing it, pursue.
John Dryden world
I am reading Jonson's verses to the memory of Shakespeare; an insolent, sparing, and invidious panegyric...
John Dryden reading
The wise, for cure, on exercise depend; God never made his work for man to mend.
John Dryden work
Words, once my stock, are wanting to commend So great a poet and so good a friend.
John Dryden men
Lord of yourself, uncumbered with a wife.
John Dryden self
Better to hunt in fields, for health unbought, Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught.The wise, for cure, on exercise depend; God never made his work for man to mend.
John Dryden work
Ill habits gather by unseen degrees — As brooks make rivers, rivers run to seas.
John Dryden sea
He was exhaled; his great Creator drew His spirit, as the sun the morning dew.
John Dryden spirit
Here lies my wife:here let her lie! Now she's at rest, and so am I.
John Dryden lies
It is almost impossible to translate verbally and well at the same time; for the Latin (a most severe and compendious language) often expresses that in one word which either the barbarity or the narrowness of modern tongues cannot supply in more. ...But since every language is so full of its own proprieties that what is beautiful in one is often barbarous, nay, sometimes nonsense, in another, it would be unreasonable to limit a translator to the narrow compass of his author's words; it is enough if he choose out some expression which does not vitiate the sense.
John Dryden time
I am as free as Nature first made man, Ere the base laws of servitude began, When wild in woods the noble savage ran.
John Dryden man
Forgiveness to the injured does belong; But they ne'er pardon who have done the wrong.
John Dryden wrong
What precious drops are those Which silently each other's track pursue, Bright as young diamonds in their infant dew?
John Dryden you
Fame then was cheap, and the first comer sped; And they have kept it since by being dead.
John Dryden sin
Let those find fault whose wit's so very small, They've need to show that they can think at all; Errors, like straws, upon the surface flow; He who would search for pearls, must dive below.
John Dryden think
What flocks of critics hover here to-day, As vultures wait on armies for their prey, All gaping for the carcase of a play! With croaking notes they bode some dire event, And follow dying poets by the scent.
John Dryden dying
He's somewhat lewd; but a well-meaning mind; Weeps much; fights little; but is wond'rous kind.
John Dryden mind
A brave man scorns to quarrel once a day; Like Hectors in at every petty fray.
John Dryden man
Let those find fault whose wit's so very small, They've need to show that they can think at all; Errors, like straws, upon the surface flow; He who would search for pearls, must dive below. Fops may have leave to level all they can; As pigmies would be glad to lop a man. Half-wits are fleas; so little and so light, We scarce could know they live, but that they bite.
John Dryden light
Give, you gods, Give to your boy, your Caesar, The rattle of a globe to play withal, This gewgaw world, and put him cheaply off; I'll not be pleased with less than Cleopatra.
John Dryden god
The wretched have no friends.
John Dryden friends
Men are but children of a larger growth; Our appetites as apt to change as theirs, And full as craving, too, and full as vain.
John Dryden change
With how much ease believe we what we wish!
John Dryden believe
Whatever is, is in its causes just.
John Dryden hate
His hair just grizzled, As in a green old age.
John Dryden age
Of no distemper, of no blast he died, But fell like autumn fruit that mellowed long — Even wondered at, because he dropped no sooner. Fate seemed to wind him up for fourscore years, Yet freshly ran he on ten winters more; Till like a clock worn out with eating time, The wheels of weary life at last stood still.
John Dryden life
She, though in full-blown flower of glorious beauty, Grows cold even in the summer of her age.
John Dryden beauty
There is a pleasure sure In being mad which none but madmen know.
John Dryden men
Lord of humankind.
John Dryden man
Like a led victim, to my death I'll go, And, dying, bless the hand that gave the blow.
John Dryden death
Second thoughts, they say, are best.
John Dryden thoughts
He's a sure card.
John Dryden
They say everything in the world is good for something.
John Dryden world
As sure as a gun.
John Dryden
Nor can his blessed soul look down from heaven, Or break the eternal sabbath of his rest.
John Dryden soul
Whate’er he did was done with so much ease, In him alone 't was natural to please.
John Dryden hate
Plots, true or false, are necessary things, To raise up commonwealths and ruin kings.
John Dryden wealth
Of these the false Achitophel was first, A name to all succeeding ages cursed. For close designs and crooked counsels fit, Sagacious, bold, and turbulent of wit, Restless, unfixed in principles and place, In power unpleased, impatient of disgrace; A fiery soul, which working out its way, Fretted the pygmy-body to decay: And o'er-informed the tenement of clay. A daring pilot in extremity; Pleased with the danger, when the waves went high He sought the storms; but for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands to boast his wit. Great wits are sure to madness near allied, And thin partitions do their bounds divide.
John Dryden art
A daring pilot in extremity; Pleas'd with the danger, when the waves went high He sought the storms; but for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands, to boast his wit.Great wits are sure to madness near alli'd; And thin partitions do their bounds divide: Else, why should he, with wealth and honour blest, Refuse his age the needful hours of rest? Punish a body which he could not please; Bankrupt of life, yet prodigal of ease? And all to leave, what with his toil he won To that unfeather'd, two-legg'd thing, a son: Got, while his soul did huddled notions try; And born a shapeless lump, like anarchy.
John Dryden life
In friendship false, implacable in hate, Resolved to ruin or to rule the state.
John Dryden friendship
And heaven had wanted one immortal song. But wild Ambition loves to slide, not stand, And Fortune's ice prefers to Virtue's land.
John Dryden love
Auspicious Prince! at whose nativity Some royal planet rul'd the southern sky; Thy longing country's darling and desire; Their cloudy pillar, and their guardian fire: Their second Moses, whose extended wand Divides the seas, and shows the promis'd land: Whose dawning day, in very distant age, Has exercis'd the sacred prophet's rage: The people's pray'r, the glad diviner's theme, The young men's vision, and the old men's dream!
John Dryden people
Behold him setting in his western skies, The shadows lengthening as the vapours rise.
John Dryden
His courage foes, his friends his truth proclaim.
John Dryden truth
All empire is no more than power in trust.
John Dryden power
Better one suffer, than a nation grieve.
John Dryden
Your case no tame expedients will afford, Resolve on death or conquest by the sword, Which for no less a stake than life you draw, And self-defence is Nature's eldest law.
John Dryden life
But far more numerous was the herd of such, Who think too little, and who talk too much.
John Dryden think
A man so various, that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome; Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong, Was everything by starts, and nothing long; But, in the course of one revolving moon, Was chemist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon.
John Dryden art
Railing and praising were his usual themes; And both, to show his judgment, in extremes; So over violent, or over civil, That every man with him was God or devil.
John Dryden men
Thus in a pageant-show a plot is made; And peace itself is war in masquerade.
John Dryden war
Nor is the people's judgment always true: The most may err as grossly as the few.
John Dryden people
Large was his wealth, but larger was his heart.
John Dryden art
Of ancient race by birth, but nobler yet In his own worth.
John Dryden race
Never was patriot yet, but was a fool.
John Dryden
How ill my Fear they by my Mercy scan, Beware the Fury of a Patient Man.
John Dryden war
Oh that my Pow'r to Saving were confin’d: Why am I forc’d, like Heav’n, against my mind, To make Examples of another Kind? Must I at length the Sword of Justice draw? Oh curst Effects of necessary Law! How ill my Fear they by my Mercy scan,Beware the Fury of a Patient Man.
John Dryden war
Made still a blund'ring kind of melody; Spurred boldly on, and dashed through thick and thin, Through sense and nonsense, never out nor in. Free from all meaning, whether good or bad, And in one word, heroically mad.
John Dryden good
Railing in other men may be a crime, But ought to pass for mere instinct in him: Instinct he follows and no further knows, For to write verse with him is to transprose.
John Dryden men
With all this bulk there's nothing lost in Og, For every inch that is not fool is rogue : A monstrous mass of fuul corrupted matter, As all the devils had spew'd to make the baiter. When wine has given him courage to blaspheme, He curses God, but God before curst him ; And, if man could have reason, none has more. That made his paunch so rich, and him so poor.
John Dryden courage
All human things are subject to decay, And, when fate summons, monarchs must obey.
John Dryden fate
The rest to some faint meaning make pretense, But Shadwell never deviates into sense. Some beams of wit on other souls may fall, Strike through and make a lucid interval; But Shadwell's genuine night admits no ray, His rising fogs prevail upon the day.
John Dryden soul
Leave writing plays, and choose for thy command Some peaceful province in acrostic land. There thou mayst wings display and altars raise, And torture one poor word ten thousand ways.
John Dryden writing
Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call today his own; He who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow, do thy worst, for I have lived today.
John Dryden man
Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine, The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine.Not heaven itself upon the past has power; But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour.
John Dryden power
I can enjoy her while she's kind; But when she dances in the wind, And shakes the wings and will not stay, I puff theaway: The little or the much she gave is quietly resign'd:Content with poverty, my soul I arm; And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.
John Dryden war
What passion cannot Music raise and quell?
John Dryden passion
From harmony, from heavenly harmony, This universal frame began: When nature underneath a heap Of jarring atoms lay, And could not heave her head, The tuneful voice was heard from high, 'Arise, ye more than dead!' Then cold, and hot, and moist, and dry, In order to their stations leap, And Music's power obey.From harmony, from heavenly harmony, This universal frame began: From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man.
John Dryden nature

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