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King Lear

Unhappy that I am, I cannot heave My heart into my mouth
King Lear art
Mend your speech a little, Lest you may mar your fortunes.
King Lear you
Thy truth, then, be thy dower.
King Lear truth
Kill thy physician, and the fee bestow Upon the foul disease.
King Lear sea
Time shall unfold what plighted cunning hides: Who cover faults, at last shame them derides
King Lear light
Striving to better, oft we mar what's well.
King Lear
Nothing can come of nothing: speak again.
King Lear
Unhappy that I am, I cannot heave My heart into my mouth: I love your majesty According to my bond; no more nor less.
King Lear love
Lear: So young, and so untender?Cordelia: So young, my lord, and true.Lear: Let it be so; — thy truth, then, be thy dower.
King Lear truth
Come not between the dragon and his wrath.
King Lear
Tis the infirmity of his age: yet he hath ever but slenderly known himself.
King Lear self
Who, in the lusty stealth of nature, take More composition and fierce quality Than doth, within a dull, stale, tired bed, Go to the creating a whole tribe of fops Got 'tween asleep and wake?
King Lear nature
Now, gods, stand up for bastards!
King Lear god
We have seen the best of our time: machinations, hollowness, treachery, and all ruinous disorders, follow us disquietly to our graves.
King Lear time
This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeit of our own behaviour, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villains by necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion, knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical predominance, drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence; and all that we are evil in, by a divine thrusting on: an admirable evasion of whore-master man, to lay his goatish disposition to the charge of a star!
King Lear world
Truth's a dog must to kennel; he must be whipped out, when Lady the brach may stand by the fire and stink.
King Lear fire
Have more than thou showest, Speak less than thou knowest, Lend less than thou owest, Ride more than thou goest, Learn more than thou trowest, Set less than thou throwest; Leave thy drink and thy whore, And keep in-a-door, And thou shall have more Than two tens to a score.
King Lear end
The hedge sparrow fed the cuckoo so long, That it had it head bit off by it young.
King Lear you
Ingratitude, thou marble-hearted fiend, More hideous, when thou show'st thee in a child Than the sea-monster!
King Lear art
How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is To have a thankless child!
King Lear child
Have more than thou showest, Speak less than thou knowest, Lend less than thou owest, Ride more than thou goest, Learn more than thou trowest, Set less than thou throwest; Leave thy drink and thy whore, And keep in-a-door, And thou shall have more Than two tens to a score.The Fool, Scene IV
King Lear learn
Howl, howl, howl, howl! O! you are men of stones: Had I your tongues and eyes, Id use them so That heavens vaults should crack. — Shes gone for ever! — I know when one is dead, and when one lives; Shes dead as earth.Lear, Scene III
King Lear art
He that has and a little tiny wit, With hey, ho, the wind and the rain, Must make content with his fortunes fit, Though the rain it raineth every day.The Fool, Scene II
King Lear rain
Is man no more than this? Consider him well. Thou owest the worm no silk, the beast no hide, the sheep no wool, the cat no perfume. Ha! heres three on s are sophisticated; thou art the thing itself; unaccomodated man is no more but such a poor, bare, forked animal as thou art.Lear, Scene IV
King Lear art
Poor naked wretches, wheresoeer you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides, Your loopd and windowd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these? O! I have taen Too little care of this! Take physic, pomp; Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel, That thou mayst shake the superflux to them, And show the heavens more just.Lear, Scene IV
King Lear self
That sir which serves and seeks for gain, And follows but for form, Will pack when it begins to rain, And leave thee in the storm. But I will tarry; the fool will stay, And let the wise man fly: The knave turns fool that runs away; The fool, no knave, perdy.The Fool, Scene IV
King Lear man
Time shall unfold what plighted cunning hides: Who cover faults, at last shame them derides.Cordelia, Scene I
King Lear time
The hedge sparrow fed the cuckoo so long, That it had it head bit off by it young.The Fool, Scene IV
King Lear you
And my poor fool is hangd! No, no, no life! Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, And thou no breath at all? Thoult come no more, Never, never, never, never, never! Pray you, undo this button: thank you sir. Do you see this? Look on her, look, her lips, Look there, look there!Lear, Scene III
King Lear life
I am a very foolish fond old man, Fourscore and upward, not an hour more or less; And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind.Lear, Scene VII
King Lear fear
Ingratitude, thou marble-hearted fiend, More hideous, when thou showst thee in a child Than the sea-monster!Lear, Scene IV
King Lear art
Truths a dog must to kennel; he must be whipped out, when Lady the brach may stand by the fire and stink.The Fool, scene iv; brach is an archaic term for bitch.
King Lear truth
And worse I may be yet: the worst is not, So long as we can say, This is the worst.Edgar, Scene I
King Lear
How fearful And dizzy tis to cast ones eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air Show scarce so gross as beetles; halfway down Hangs one that gathers samphire, — dreadful trade! Methinks he seems no bigger than his head. The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice, and yond tall anchoring bark Diminished to her cock; her cock, a buoy Almost too small for sight. The murmuring surge, That on the unnumbered idle pebbles chafes, Cannot be heard so high.Edgar, Scene VI
King Lear fear
O, sir, you are old; Nature in you stands on the very verge Of her confine: you should be ruld and led By some discretion, that discerns your state Better than you yourself.Regan, Scene IV
King Lear nature
Vex not his ghost: O! let him pass; he hates him That would upon the rack of this tough world Stretch him out longer.Kent, Scene III
King Lear world
We have seen the best of our time: machinations, hollowness, treachery, and all ruinous disorders, follow us disquietly to our graves.Gloucester, Scene II
King Lear time
When we are born, we cry that we are come To this great stage of fools — This a good block: — It were a delicate strategem to shoe A troop of horse with felt: Ill put t in proof; And when I have stoln upon these sons-in-law, Then kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, kill!Lear, Scene VI
King Lear good
You see me here, you gods, a poor old man, As full of grief as age; wretched in both! If it be you that stir these daughters hearts Against their father, fool me not so much To bear it tamely; touch me with noble anger, And let not womens weapons, water-drops, Stain my mans cheeks!Lear, Scene IV
King Lear god

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